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The Guardian (U.K.) 

Magnetic brain stimulation treatment shown to boost memory

Non-invasive transcranial technique leads to 24-hour-long improvement in memory function and could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's and other conditions Continue reading...

From the archive, 29 August 1961: Why chimps are no chumps

Some animals can doze through life in a zoo. But higher primates cannot stand monotony. It was largely to combat this that hourly performances were organised. Continue reading...

Ardbeg distillery anticipates zero gravity single malt's return to Earth

Space-aged whisky was launched in 2011 with the stated aim of discovering how maturation would be affected by low gravity Continue reading...

New books party

What good is a weekend without a good book to read? Take a look at these books -- hot off the presses -- that you may enjoy! Continue reading...

The EU needs good science policy. But does that mean it needs a Chief Scientific Adviser?

The new head of the EU Commission is being challenged over whether to continue with the post of EU Chief Scientific Adviser. Doug Parr explains why Continue reading...

Hodgkin, Who and hospital food - blogs roundup

Posts on the network this week included a look at the work of Yoshiki Sasai, footage of celebrity wolves, and in-depth coverage from the largest ever summit on scientific advice Continue reading...

Brand new brain myths to keep neurobloggers in work

The recent release of Susan Greenfields new book and the film Lucy, both of which are dependent on tired misconceptions or dubious theories about the brain, suggest one worrying conclusion: we are running out of myths about the brain. So here are some new ones, to keep things mysterious Continue reading...

Secrets of animal camouflage research

This interesting video, courtesy of the BBSRC and Project Nightjar, reveals the secrets of animal camouflage research. Continue reading...

Hospital food standards: did medieval hospitals do it better?

Todays report on hospital food standards emphasises the struggle we seem to have providing good food to modern patients: yet medieval patients got personalised diets, fresh figs, local honey and chicken in saffron stew, so whats gone wrong? Continue reading...

Libertarian ideology is the natural enemy of science

Whether the issue is climate change, healthcare or gun control, libertarians are on a permanent collision course with evidence Continue reading...

Crisis, renewal and the prospects for science advice in Japan

Public and political confidence in Japans science system collapsed after the devastating earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima nuclear disaster in March 2011. Tateo Arimoto and Yasushi Sato describe the process of rebuilding trust and reforming Japanese science policy Continue reading...

Iceland volcano: why a repeat of the 2010 flight chaos is unlikely

Geologist Andy Hooper explains why the chances of a huge eruption of the Bárðarbunga volcano in Iceland and massive disruption of air travel are low Continue reading...

Valuing the public in science advice

We need a strong scientific voice in policy and decision-making, but there is also a crucial role for the public Continue reading...

Mental health stigma hasn't gone away

Stigma surrounding mental health comes in many forms, and its important to understand what the differences are Continue reading...

Artificial leg slip

Continue reading...

Eggcellent citizen science: evolution of camouflage in bird eggs

How an online video game relies on citizen scientists to test the evolution of avian egg camouflage colours and patterns. Continue reading...

Ambassadors for evidence

The need for scientists and policymakers to work together around the world has never been greater. Sir Mark Walport, the UK governments chief scientific adviser, sets out his agenda for science diplomacy Continue reading...

A rough guide to science advice

As scientists and policymakers gather in Auckland for a global summit on scientific advice, what lessons can we identify that apply across diverse national systems? Continue reading...

The man who grew eyes

Growing nerve tissue and organs is a sci-fi dream. I met the pioneering researcher who grew eyes and brain cells Continue reading...

Northern lights filmed from space - timelapse video

Amazing timelapse footage released by the European Space Agency shows the northern lights being filmed from the International Space Station. The images were taken on 23 July and show an intense green light surrounding the space station. The station can be seen orbiting the planet as normal before the green lights come into view Continue reading...

Amputee hails new prosthetic: 'It's like they've given me my leg back'

Implant attached to bone in pioneering technique that helps prevent infection and discomfort Continue reading...

From marvellous to awesome: how spoken British English has changed

A study called the Spoken British National Corpus 2014 reveals how our use of language is evolving. Is British English succumbing to American influence? Continue reading...

Government science advice: where are the honest brokers?

Scientific and political leaders need to focus more attention on the integrity of advisory processes, rather than taking sides in the political battles of the day Continue reading...

Principles and politics of scientific advice

This week, scientists, policymakers and experts from more than forty-five countries assemble in Auckland, for the largest-ever summit on scientific advice. Sir Peter Gluckman, chief science advisor of New Zealand and convenor of the meeting, previews the topics that will be discussed. Continue reading...

Talking to the voices in our heads

A promising approach to treating people who hear voices, also known as auditory hallucinations, is to get the patient or therapist to interact with the speaker Continue reading...

Star-crossed wolves produce litter of seven

Incredible footage just broadcast in the Italian media reveals that the celebrity wolves Slavc and Juliet have just had a litter of seven cubs. Continue reading...

Cannabis really can trigger paranoia

The largest ever study of the effects of the main psychoactive component of cannabis suggests that it can cause paranoia in vulnerable individuals Continue reading...

Retractions are coming thick and fast: it's time for publishers to act

Journal publishers must acknowledge the limitations of traditional peer review and embrace post-publication peer review Continue reading...

Pope Francis and the psychology of exorcism and possession

Endorsement of exorcism by the Vatican will do nothing to prevent future tragedies like the death of Victoria Climbié Continue reading...

Turing test: this little Eugene Goostman was much brighter than I imagined

Four times I was fairly confident I had spotted the machine answering and I was wrong every time Continue reading...


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