News Games Screen savers eCards Photos Help

You are not signed in. Sign In • Sign Up

 

The Guardian (U.K.) 

Piggybacking cells hold clue to cancer growth and treatment for melanoma

Discovery of how slow but invasive cells hitch ride on fast growing cells could help create a new drug to tackle skin cancer Continue reading...

Russia loses contact with satellite full of geckos

Photon-M satellite and five reptiles on board will be lost unless contact can be re-established, says space industry source Continue reading...

Paracetamol does not help lower back pain, study finds

Researchers say painkiller is no better than placebo despite being frequently prescribed for condition Continue reading...

Spacewatch: Rubber duck in view

Continue reading...

HFEA panel on mitochondrial replacement considered all submissions

Continue reading...

The owl who liked sitting on Caesar by Martin Windrow - review

A gentle and moving memoir by a man who shared his seventh-floor London flat with an unlikely companion; a tawny owl Continue reading...

Science advisers should be supported, not sacked

A coalition of environmental NGOs is calling for the post of Europe's chief scientist to be axed. Roger Pielke Jr explains why this is a misguided and shortsighted proposal Continue reading...

The Fightin Irish? Not when it comes to recession and austerity

Why has the Irish response to the financial crisis been so peaceful? Research in cultural psychology may provide some insights, argue Séamus A Power and David Nussbaum Continue reading...

Researchers find first sign that tyrannosaurs hunted in packs

Discovery of three sets of dinosaur trackways in Canada reveals that predators were running together Continue reading...

Dogs feel jealous of rival pets, study finds

Animal behaviour linked to primordial instinct of jealousy similar to that seen in babies when affection is divided Continue reading...

New stem cell operation could revolutionise treatment of knee injuries

Operation being trialled at Southampton hospital involves coating damaged cartilage with stem cells from patient's hip Continue reading...

Pandas search high and low to get their fill of different bamboos

Chinese and Australian scientists find pandas migrate long distances to maintain a balanced diet which helps them breed Continue reading...

Safety concerns remain over three-person IVF

Using mitochondrial replacement therapy to create embryos with DNA from three people could have serious consequences Read HFEA panel's response here Continue reading...

Procedure to create babies with three people's DNA could be legalised in April

Government to press ahead with regulations on mitochondrial transfer after public consultation, but several hurdles remain Continue reading...

The politics of science in social media

Oliver Marsh reports on the first Guardian Political Science event Continue reading...

Great moments in science (if Twitter had existed)

Twitter is the source of a great deal of modern news, and scientists are often encouraged to tweet about their research. So what if Twitter had been around during the times of historic scientific breakthroughs and discoveries? Continue reading...

Flashy facilities arent enough to keep UK science healthy

The UK must invest in the triple-helix capacity of its universities: world-leading research, world-class education and training, and strong links with business and local economies, writes the Royal Society of Chemistry's Richard Walker Continue reading...

Was this the last wild wolf of Britain?

Adam Weymouth picks up the trail of the wolf folklore suggests was the last to roam wildly in Great Britain before being shot in the Scottish Highlands in 1680 Continue reading...

Detecting dementia: the first steps towards dignity

While we are a long way off a cure for dementia, new techniques might help us in the drive to identify it earlier, explains Tania Browne Continue reading...

From Roots to Riches: the power of plants - podcast

The first director of science at Kew Gardens, Kathy Willis, discusses her BBC Radio 4 series From Roots to Riches Continue reading...

The meaning of exponential

Why populations explode, and why traces of radioactive elements can hang around for a very long time Continue reading...

Matthew Flinders bicentenary: statue unveiled to the most famous navigator youve probably never heard of

Its a story that has it all: skill, heroic endeavour, capture by the French and a cat. Familiar to Australians, a new statue to Matthew Flinders at Euston aims to bring his reputation home Continue reading...

Meteorites, monkeys and mental health - blogs roundup

Posts on our network this week included a report on a new study into pornography addiction, the healing powers of flatulence, and a look at what particle physics and medical screening have in common Continue reading...

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: how scientifically plausible is it?

The latest Planet of the Apes movie is in UK cinemas from Thursday. Six experts in primate evolution, anatomy, behaviour and communication deliver their verdicts on the film_Scroll down to watch Carole Jahme interview Andy Serkis, who plays the chimp Caesar_ Continue reading...

How to handle the heat (with science)

Many are reporting that this weekend could see a heatwave in the UK. But wherever and whenever they are, intelligent humans have developed ways to cool down, some of which are more drastic than others Continue reading...

Films that help parents bring science home to their children

Many home science demonstrations fail to convey crucial aspects of the subject. The Royal Institution's ExpeRimental films aim to change that Continue reading...

Nasa's Curiosity rover finds large iron meteorite on Mars

The iron meteorite discovered by the Curiosity rover must once have been at the heart of a growing planet that was shattered aeons ago Continue reading...

It could save my children, but I don't want to know

What do particle physics and medical screening have in common? And why might we want to be tested, but not hear the result? Continue reading...

Smoking and mental health, what's the connection?

People with mental health problems who smoke cost the UK economy £2.34bn, according to new research. But why is smoking so prevalent in this group? Continue reading...

Silent, not deadly; how farts cure diseases

A recent study from the University of Exeter has been reported as showing that smelling farts can cure cancer, as well as many other diseases. Although the study itself doesnt actually say this at any point, if farts do have healing powers it would have numerous wide-reaching implications Continue reading...


Inbox.com News | Awards & Certificates | Promote Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Uninstall Info

© 2014 Inbox.com. All rights reserved. Inbox.com is part of the Xacti Group Companies.
All other names are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective owners.