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Disgraced Japan researcher fails to replicate 'game changing' stem cell results

By Elaine Lies TOKYO (Reuters) - A disgraced Japanese researcher has failed to replicate results hailed as a potential breakthrough in stem-cell treatment and efforts to do so will be abandoned, officials at her research institute said on Friday. The scandal involving the research, which detailed simple ways to reprogram mature cells back to an embryonic-like state, eventually led to the retract

Europe recommends approval for first stem-cell therapy

LONDON (Reuters) - European regulators have recommended approval of the first medicine containing stem cells to treat a rare condition caused by burns to the eye. The European Medicines Agency said on Friday that Holoclar, from privately held Italian company Chiesi, had been given a green light for moderate to severe limbal stem cell deficiency due to physical or chemical burns. Left untreated, th

Songbirds fly coop long before tornadoes arrive in Tennessee

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - You might want to be careful about who you call a birdbrain. Some of our feathered friends exhibit powers of perception that put humans to shame. Scientists said on Thursday that little songbirds known as golden-winged warblers fled their nesting grounds in Tennessee up to two days before the arrival of a fierce storm system that unleashed 84 tornadoes in so

SpaceX delays planned cargo run to space station to early January

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Space Exploration Technologies is delaying the planned launch on Friday of an unmanned Falcon 9 rocket, which will carry a cargo ship to the International Space Station for NASA, to early January, officials said on Thursday. Liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida had been planned for 1:22 p.m. EST, but an undisclosed technical issue with the roc

India tests its heaviest space launch vehicle, eyes global market

By Aditya Kalra NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India's space agency successfully tested on Thursday its most powerful satellite launch vehicle that can put heavier payloads into space, and, it hopes, win India a bigger slice of the $300 billion global space industry. The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) also checked the working of an unmanned crew module on the vehicle, which could give the agency

Super Typhoon Shoved Car-Size Boulders Onto Philippine Beaches

Boulders the size of stretch limousines littered beaches near the city of Tacloban in the Philippines after Super Typhoon Haiyan pounded the region in November 2013. The towering stones provided a rare look at the way intense storms can demolish coastal communities, researchers said here on Tuesday (Dec. 16) at the American Geophysical Union's annual meeting. The surprising findings: freak waves t

Fool's Gold Preserves Some of Earth's Oldest Fossils

Fool's gold helps explain why many fossils of soft-bodied animals that lived more than 540 million years ago still survive, a new study finds.

8,000-Year-Old Olive Oil Found in Ancient Clay Pots

Ancient people pressed olive oil as far back as 8,000 years ago in Israel, a new study finds. Researchers found residues of the Mediterranean-diet staple on ancient clay pots dating back to the 6th millennium B.C. "This is the earliest evidence of the use of olive oil in the country, and perhaps the entire Mediterranean basin," Ianir Milevski and Nimrod Getzov, excavation directors at the Israel

Active Sun Unleashes Massive Solar Flare

The huge solar flare registered as an X1.8-class event, one of the most powerful types of flares possible, and was captured on camera by NASA's powerful Solar Dynamics Observatory. The flare triggered a strong radio blackout for parts of Earth as it peaked Friday at 7:28 p.m. EST (0028 Dec. 20 GMT), according to an alert from the U.S. Space Weather Prediction Center overseen by NOAA. The solar f

SpaceX's Next Launch to Space Station Delayed Until New Year

The private spaceflight company SpaceX won't be flying its next delivery mission to the International Space Station until early 2015. SpaceX was originally expected to launch its Falcon 9 rocket carrying an uncrewed Dragon cargo ship to the station for NASA today (Dec. 19), but the launch was delayed partly due to a problem with the rocket. SpaceX is now expected to launch its fifth official mis

Voyager 1 Rides 'Tsunami Wave' in Interstellar Space

It turns out that sailing through interstellar space isn't so peaceful. NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft — the only object made by humans to reach interstellar space — might still be caught what scientists have described as a cosmic "tsunami wave," a shock wave that first hit the probe in February, according to new research. You can hear the eerie interstellar vibrations in a video, courtesy of NASA.

Back to the future: Scientists want 'rewilded' crops to boost agriculture

By Chris Arsenault ROME (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Scientists should "re-wild" food crops by inserting lost genetic properties of ancient, edible plants in order to boost agricultural output for a growing population, a new study said. Important properties of wild plants, including varieties of wheat and rice, have been unintentionally lost during thousands of years of breeding. When humans fir

NASA Probe Piecing Together How Mars' Atmosphere Escapes to Space

A NASA spacecraft that recently arrived in orbit around Mars is already helping to solve a Martian mystery. Scientists are using the space agency's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft to gather more data about how Mars' atmosphere bled molecules out into space over time. The agency released early results from the probe today (Dec. 15), showing how the continuous stream of p

Why Birds Don't Have Teeth

The common ancestor of all living birds sported a set of pearly whites 116 million years ago, a new study finds. In the study, researchers looked at the mutated remains of tooth genes in modern birds to figure out when birds developed "edentulism" — an absence of teeth. Ancient birds have left only a fragmented fossil record, but studying the genes of modern birds can help clarify how the bird l

Actor Seth Green Designs Mission Patch for Space Station Science

Looking at the latest mission patch bound for the International Space Station, you would never know it was designed by actor Seth Green.

Scientists work to conserve 2,500-year-old mummy

CHICAGO (AP) — Conservation work has started at Chicago's Field Museum on the 2,500-year-old mummy of a 14-year-old Egyptian boy.

Scientists create 'feel fuller' food ingredient

LONDON (Reuters) - British scientists have developed an ingredient that makes foods more filling, and say initial tests in overweight people showed that it helped prevent them gaining more weight. The ingredient, developed by researchers at London's Imperial College and at the University of Glasgow, contains propionate, a natural substance that stimulates the gut to release hormones that act on th

U.N.'s Ban says no 'time for tinkering' on global warming action

By Valerie Volcovici and Mitra Taj LIMA (Reuters) - U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, expressing deep concern about slow action to combat climate change, told governments at U.N. talks in Lima on Tuesday there was no "time for tinkering" and urged a radical shift to greener economies. Ban said there was still a chance of limiting global warming to an internationally agreed ceiling of 2 degrees

Guiding African Wildlife Through Global Warming

Jessica Arriens is a public affairs specialist for the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) contributed this article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. The Congo basin is an unruly ribbon of tropical forest, more than a million square miles spanning six countries in Central Africa, running inward along the equator from the continent's western coast. In Central Africa, those for

Rhino species to die unless science can help

OL PEJETA, Kenya (AP) — The task was never going to be easy: Fly four highly endangered rhinos from a Czech Republic zoo to East Africa, drive them to the savannah grasses of Mount Kenya and hope that the natural environment helps produce a calf, staving off extinction.

UN's Ban says no 'time for tinkering' on global warming action

By Valerie Volcovici and Mitra Taj LIMA (Reuters) - U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, expressing deep concern about slow action to combat climate change, told governments at U.N. talks in Lima on Tuesday there was no "time for tinkering" and urged a radical shift to greener economies. Ban said there was still a chance of limiting global warming to an internationally agreed ceiling of 2 degrees

Math for Drones, Self-Driving Cars Wins Top Student Science Award

Mathematical research that could help drones navigate, and computer models for how trees growsnagged top honors at a national student math and science competition, the event's organizers announced today (Dec. 9). Peter Tian, a senior at The Wellington School in Columbus, Ohio, took home the $100,000 grand prize in the individual category for mathematical research on pattern avoidance for multidi

MIT pulls online lectures over harassment claim

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has removed a retired physics professor's lectures from an online learning platform because the school concluded he had sexually harassed a woman, university officials ...

What Is Life? It's a Tricky, Confusing Question

Hence the operational definition of "life" in the Viking biology experiments was the ability to metabolize in the conditions of the experiment. There are several problems with this operational definition.

Global warming threat cut slightly, still severe - study

LIMA (Reuters) - Projected global warming this century has slowed but is still at a severe rate after promises by China, the United States and the European Union to limit greenhouse gas emissions, a scientific study showed on Monday. The Climate Action Tracker, produced by an independent group of scientists, said temperatures were set to rise by about 3 degrees Celsius (5.6 Fahrenheit) above pre

White House focuses on computer science in schools

WASHINGTON (AP) — Smartphones and laptops have become essential tools for today's teenagers. But finding out how to make computers work has taken a backseat to other priorities in U.S. schools.

Scientists re-create what may be life's first spark

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists in a lab used a powerful laser to re-create what might have been the original spark of life on Earth.

Scientists find brain mechanism behind glucose greed

LONDON (Reuters) - British scientists have found a brain mechanism they think may drive our desire for glucose-rich food and say the discovery could one day lead to better treatments for obesity. In experiments using rats, researchers at Imperial College London found a mechanism that appears to sense how much glucose is reaching the brain and prompts animals to seek more if it detects a shortfall.

Who Stood Up for Science in 2014? (Op-Ed)

Andrew Whelton is an environmental engineer at Purdue University. When Freedom Industries spilled chemicals into West Virginia's Elk River in January, 300,000 people suddenly found themselves without access to safe tap water. Whelton drove his student and faculty team nearly 900 miles to help, and they did so as volunteers, without the promise of funding for their work.

Putin urges to develop Russian science to fend off sanctions

By Vladimir Soldatkin ST PETERSBURG, Russia (Reuters) - President Vladimir Putin said on Monday that Russia should make a leap in developing its fundamental science after Western powers limited the country's access to modern technology as part of sanctions over Moscow's actions in Ukraine. The West has introduced sanctions against Russia, ranging from visa bans and asset freezes to restricting its


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